For most lesions, cryotherapy is a permanent removal. Some lesions are harder to remove than others. In addition, it is necessary to obtain a result with the least damage to the surrounding skin. In other instances, a deep lesion may take several aggressive treatments to get results. It is important to have an instrument that can adapt to variable dosing of power.

 

Yes, but cautions about skin type and location be considered prior to deciding on freeze times. People with high levels of cryoglobulins should be treated with caution. If with dark skin, one may not want to have cryotherapy, it will kill the melanocytes around the treated area, making the skin in that area lighter.

 

The applicator is held as close as possible to the skin imperfection and moved quickly towards and away from it. This could be from 1-30 seconds, depending on the size and depth. After the first freeze cycle, the tissue can thaw for about 30 seconds. Now the second freeze cycle will begin. The tissue will freeze faster than during the first freezing cycle.

 

Cryotherapy requires no anaesthesia and has less scarring than other techniques of skin removal with minimal post-op care. Treatment goes fast and can be integrated into daily practice.

 

Cryotherapy is a procedure that uses extreme cold to destroy tissue. The process is called cryo-necrosis, tissue destruction by freezing.