CORONAVIRUS (COVID-19)

It is caused by a member of the coronavirus family that has never been encountered before. Like other coronaviruses, it has come from animals. It first emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan in November 2019. The World Health Organisation has declared it a pandemic. COVID-19 is also dangerous – so far, around 20 per cent of confirmed cases have been classed as severe or critical. So far, around 15 to 20 per cent of hospital cases have been classed as “severe” and the current death rate varies between 0.7 per cent and 3.4 per cent depending on the location and, crucially, access to good hospital care.

This is much lower than fatality rates for Mers (30 per cent) and Sars (10 per cent), but still a significant threat.

Scientists in China believe that Covid-19 has mutated into two strains, one more aggressive than the other, which could make developing a vaccine more complicated.

It is very important that individuals with symptoms that may be due to coronavirus and their household members stay at home. Staying at home will help control the spread of the virus to friends, the wider community, and particularly the most vulnerable.

Those with symptoms and living alone should remain at home for 7 days after the onset of their symptoms. This will reduce the risk of you infecting others.

If you live with others and you or one of them have symptoms that may be caused by coronavirus, then household members must stay at home and not leave your house for 14 days. If possible, you should not go out even to buy food or other essentials, other than exercise, and in that case at a safe distance from others. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in your house became ill.

If not possible, then you should do what you can to limit your social contact when you leave the house to get supplies.

It is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or may already be infected. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community.

Staying at home may be difficult and frustrating, but there are things that you can do to help make it easier. These include:

  • plan ahead and think about what you will need in order to be able to stay at home for the full 7 or 14 days
  • Talk to your employer, friends and family to ask for their help to access the things you will need to make your stay at home a success
  • Think about and plan how you can get access to food and other supplies such as medications that you will need during this period
  • Ask friends or family to drop off anything you need or order supplies online, but make sure these are left outside your home for you to collect
  • Make sure that you keep in touch with friends and family over the phone or through social media
  • Think about things you can do during your time at home. People who have successfully completed a period of staying at home have kept themselves busy with activities such as cooking, reading, online learning and watching films
  • Many people find it helpful to plan out the full 14 days, such as on a make-shift calendar. You may also find it helpful to plan in advance what you will do if, for example, someone in the household were to feel much worse, such as have difficulties breathing
  • When you are feeling better, remember that physical exercise can be good for your well being. Look for online classes or courses

Watch for symptoms

Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and many deathshave been confirmed within the disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.

The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.

  • Fever
  • Continuous cough
  • Shortness of breath
  • High temperature you feel hot to touch on your chest or back

If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 call immediately 111.

Emergency warning signs include :

  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips/face

How to avoid catching and spreading COVID-19 (Social distancing)

What to do

wash your hands with soap and water often – do this for at least 20 seconds

  • Always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • Use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • Avoid close contact with people who have symptoms of coronavirus
  • Only travel on public transport if you need to
  • Work from home, if you can
  • Avoid social activities, such as going to pubs, restaurants, theatres and cinemas
  • Avoid events with large groups of people
  • Use phone, online services, or apps to contact your GP surgery or other NHS services

What NOT to do

X   do not touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

X  do not have visitors to your home, including friends and family

What to do if you have COVID-19Symptoms

The NHS advice is now that anyone with symptoms should stay at home for at least 7 days. If you live with other people, they should stay at home for at least 14 days, to avoid spreading the infection outside the home. This applies to everyone, regardless of whether they have traveled abroad.If you get worse or your symptoms last longer than seven days, you should call NHS 111. People will no longer be tested for the virus unless they are in hospital.

What to do if you have the CORONA VIRUS

  • If you live alone and you have symptoms of coronavirus illness (COVID-19), however mild, stay at home for 7 daysfrom when your symptoms started.
  • And, if you live with others and you are the first in the household to have symptoms of coronavirus, then then you must stay at home for 7days, but all other household members who remain well must stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the house became ill.
  • For anyone else in the household who starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for 7 days from when the symptoms appeared, regardless of what day they are on in the original 14-day isolation period.
  • It is likely that people living within a household will infect each other or be infected already. Staying at home for 14 days will greatly reduce the overall amount of infection the household could pass on to others in the community
  • If you can, move any vulnerable individuals (such as the elderly and those with underlying health conditions) out of your home, to stay with friends or family for the duration of the home isolation period
  • if you cannot move vulnerable people out of your home, stay away from them as much as possible

If you have coronavirus symptoms

  • Do not go to a GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital
  • You do not need to contact 111 to tell them you’re staying at home
  • testing for coronavirus is not needed if you’re staying at home
  • plan ahead and ask others for help to ensure that you can successfully stay at home and consider what can be done for vulnerable people in the household
  • ask your employer, friends and family to help you to get the things you need to stay at home
  • wash your hands regularly for 20 seconds, each time using soap and water, or use hand sanitiser
  • if you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, or your symptoms do not get better after 7 days, then use the NHS 111 onlinecoronavirus service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999

How long does it live in your body?

A study by The Lancet medical journal gives a sobering answer. It reports that coronavirus patients can keep the pathogen in their respiratory tract for as long as 37 days, meaning that they could remain infectious for many weeks.

Given that the current quarantine period is recommended as 14 days, patients might remain contagious long after their symptoms vanish, unwittingly spreading the virus further.

How Corona Virus is spread?

Because it’s a new illness, we do not know exactly how COVID-19 spreads from person to person.

Treatment for Coronavirus ( COVID-19)

Currently there is not specific treatment for Coronavirus, Antibiotics do not help, as they don’t work against the viruses. You will need to stay in Isolation, away from other people until you have recovered.

Can You Get Coronavirus Twice? How Long Are You Immune After COVID-19?

Reports says In Osaka, a woman in her 40s has tested positive for COVID-19 for a second time.

If you are living with children

Keep following this advice to the best of your ability, however, we are aware that not all these measures will be possible.

What we have seen so far is that children with coronavirus appear to be less severely affected. It is nevertheless important to do your best to follow this guidance.

If you have a vulnerable person living with you

  • Minimise as much as possible the time any vulnerable family members spend in shared spaces such as kitchens, bathrooms and sitting areas, and keep shared spaces well ventilated.
  • Aim to keep 2 metres (3 steps) away from vulnerable people you live with and encourage them to sleep in a different bed where possible. If they can, they should use a separate bathroom from the rest of the household. Make sure they use separate towels from the other people in your house, both for drying themselves after bathing or showering and for hand-hygiene purposes.
  • If you do share a toilet and bathroom with a vulnerable person, it is important that you clean them every time you use them (for example, wiping surfaces you have come into contact with). Another tip is to consider drawing up a rota for bathing, with the vulnerable person using the facilities first.
  • If you share a kitchen with a vulnerable person, avoid using it while they are present. If they can, they should take their meals back to their room to eat. If you have one, use a dishwasher to clean and dry the family’s used crockery and cutlery. If this is not possible, wash them using your usual washing up liquid and warm water and dry them thoroughly. If the vulnerable person is using their own utensils, remember to use a separate tea towel for drying these.
  • We understand that it will be difficult for some people to separate themselves from others at home. You should do your very best to follow this guidance and everyone in your household should regularly wash their hands, avoid touching their face, and clean frequently touched surfaces.

If you are breastfeeding while infected

  • There is currently no evidence to suggest that the virus can be transmitted through breast milk. Infection can be spread to the baby in the same way as to anyone in close contact with you. The current evidence is that children with coronavirus get much less severe symptoms than adults. The benefits of breastfeeding outweigh any potential risks of transmission of the virus through breast milk or by being in close contact; however, this will be an individual decision and can be discussed with your midwife, health visitor or GP by telephone.
  • If you or a family member are feeding with formula or expressed milk, you should sterilise the equipment carefully before each use. You should not share bottles or a breast pump with someone else.

Our prices

Contact Us for Prices

Opening hours

Monday to Friday -10am to 7pm Saturday -12am to 4pm Sunday -Only by appointment Out of hours -Only by appointment

Get an appointment

By phone: T:   0207 225 3582 M: 078 1847 4041 By email: info@yourhealthfirst.uk Or fill in the form on our Appointments page